Our website uses cookies

Cookies enable us to provide the best experience possible and help us understand how visitors use our website. By browsing Materials Today, you agree to our use of cookies.

Okay, I understand Learn more
Electronic CHANGE TOPIC

Electronic properties news, February 2020

Scientists have discovered that applying vibrational motion to topological materials can help sustain a persistent spin-locked current on their surfaces.

Researchers have developed a computer model that can predict the thermochemistry of a new high-performance electric solid propellant.

Researchers have found why some topological materials are 'fragile', unable to conduct current on their surface, and how to restore their conductivity.

stacking ultrathin and complex oxide single-crystal layers for new electronic devices

Researchers have uncovered a layered compound with a trio of properties, including high electronic mobility, not previously known to exist in one material.

Fluidizing catalyst particles in electrolyte instead of gluing them to electrodes avoids a rapid decline in electrocatalytic performance.

Physicists have created novel nanowires by threading conductive tellurium atomic chains through insulating boron nitride nanotubes.

A new analysis of neutron scattering data has revealed that the hydrogen atoms in a metal hydride are much more tightly spaced than expected.

Using a peel-away layer of graphene, researchers can produce freestanding ultrathin layers of complex oxides and then stack them together.

A novel co-polymer that can conduct ions and is also highly permeable to oxygen could make an ideal membrane for use in hydrogen fuel cells.

Researchers have discovered that spin fluctuations may bind electrons into the pairs required for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

Researchers have discovered an exotic new form of topological state in a large class of 3D semi-metallic crystals called Dirac semimetals.

Researchers have developed a more efficient, safer and cost-effective way to produce large, high purity crystals of cadmium telluride for solar cells.

Scientists have discovered that the crystal structure of halide perovskites changes with temperature, humidity and the chemical environment.

Researchers have developed an ultra-thin, ultra-flexible, transparent electronic material that can be printed and rolled out like newspaper.

The first detailed study into the electronic structure of superconducting nickelates has found that it differs markedly from the related cuprates.

News archive…

Connect with us
What’s coming up in electronic properties…
25
Jun ’20

5th International Construction, Building Materials & Technologies Exhibition

 
Webinar
 
22
Jul ’20

Register for a free webinar presented by Prof Jeffrey C. Grossman, MIT.