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Electronic CHANGE TOPIC

Electronic properties news, June 2016

First field-effect transistor made from solution processed colloidal nanoparticles.

Two-dimensional sheets of boron one atom thick have unique electronic properties.

Scientists have made ultra-thin solar cells from gallium arsenide that are flexible enough to wrap around the average pencil.

Novel combinatorial libraries of nanoparticles can allow the rapid screening of millions of different nanoparticles for specific properties.

Charge density waves induced at the interfaces between layers of ferromagnetic and superconducting materials extend deeply into superconducting regions.

Scientists have uncovered a unifying connection between seemingly unrelated materials that exhibit extreme magnetoresistance.

Using a supercomputer, scientists have managed to produce an accurate model showing how superconductivity develops in cuprates.

When layered perovskites are stretched or compressed, their electrical polarization does not increase as expected but instead goes away completely.

Scientists have developed a novel tri-layer metasurface solar absorber comprising a layer of amorphous carbon sandwiched between thin gold films.

Scientists have created complex 2D and 3D structures, including a cube and a prism, made from DNA and nanoparticles.

Read about the event at IMDEA Materials Institute, Madrid, Spain, which will honor Professor Subra Suresh.

By electroplating a nanofiber polymer mat, scientists have produced an ultrathin film that is both transparent and highly conductive.

Neutron and X-ray studies have revealed that an elusive massless particle known as a Weyl fermion could exist in an osmium-based material.

Graphene-based wearable patch provides noninvasive blood glucose monitoring for diabetic patients.

Register for the workshop here.

A highly flexible OLED with excellent efficiency uses graphene as a transparent electrode between layers of titanium dioxide and a conducting polymer.

The orbital movement of electrons, rather than electron spin, is the driving force behind the strong magnetism of a metallic material.

A new material comprising alternating layers of molybdenum boride and aluminum can form its own corrosion-resistant coating.

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