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Electronic CHANGE TOPIC

Electronic properties news, July 2014

The magnets cluttering the face of your refrigerator may one day be used as cooling agents, according to a new theory formulated by MIT researchers.

An elusive state of matter called superconductivity could be realized in stacks of sheetlike crystals just a few atoms thick, physicists have determined.

Researchers in China have demonstrated that nanowires of potassium niobate can act as UV-A photodetecting materials.

Researchers have used a microscope to study the relationship between the atomic geometry of a ribbon of graphene and its electrical properties.

New laser reference device, traditional quartz “tuning fork” and coin for scale. Credit: Jiang Li/Caltech

Polayacenes for improved solar cells.

The first experimental evidence for a boron buckyball has been obtained by chemists in the US and China.

Thank you to all who have submitted. Winners to be announced at the Materials Today Asia conference in December.

Researchers have developed a novel, tunable nanoantenna that paves the way for new kinds of plasmonic-based optomechanical systems.

Scientists have demonstrated for the first time a photonic router – a quantum device based on a single atom.

The fractional quantum Hall effect has been observed in bilayer graphene and shown to be tunable with an electric field.

A narrow enough ribbon will transform a conductor into a semiconductor.

Skyrmions, subatomic quasiparticles that could play a key role in future spintronic technologies, have been observed for the first time using x-rays.

Scientists at USC have developed a water-based organic battery that is long lasting, built from cheap, eco-friendly components.

Researchers have developed a material which transports a magnetic field from one location to the other, similar to how a hose transports water.

The best in materials science news from June 2014.

After two years of effort, researchers have successfully measured the collective mass of ‘massless’ electrons in motion in graphene.

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