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Electronic CHANGE TOPIC

Electronic properties news, September 2020

By studying how strontium ruthenate responds to sound waves, researchers have discovered it may be a new type of superconductor known as g-wave.

Researchers have developed a low-cost method for fabricating thin nanoribbons of molybdenum disulfide at a large scale.

Making multiferrorics magnetizable with a titanium dopant

A novel framework for identifying and assessing the spin textures of crystalline materials could help develop low-energy computing technology.

A new rubbery polymer semiconductor with high carrier mobility can be used to produce smart electronic skin and a medical robotic hand.

By aligning them and improving their conductivity, researchers have enhanced the piezoelectric properties of peptide-based nanotubes.

Researchers have discovered that a small change in the direction of the magnetic field in a symmetrical crystal can alter its electrical polarization.

Small imperfections in the lenses used to focus electron microscope beams can lead to the crystal phases in 2D materials being misidentified.

A novel optical detection system may have shown that grain boundaries are no barrier for thermoelectrical materials, but they still can't take the strain.

Researchers have confirmed that the intrinsic magnetism in the bulk of a topological insulator can extend to the electrons at its surface.

Researchers have uncovered the atomic mechanism that makes tin-based thermoelectric materials incredibly efficient at high temperatures.

Disordered rocksalt made of lithium, vanadium and oxygen makes a safe, powerful. long-lasting anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

By probing the electronic behavior of a superconducting cuprate, researchers have uncovered evidence for quantum critical points.

Researchers have found a way to get nanoclusters of copper molecules to self-assemble so they can mimic biomolecules such as DNA and proteins.

By introducing isolated defects into a ferroelectric, researchers have managed to turn it into a top-performing energy-storage material.

Adding a layer of a noble metal to the surface of a semiconducting crystal changes its structure and gives it completely novel electric properties.

Using a wet spinning process, researchers have produced carbon nanotube fibers that are stronger than Kevlar and almost as conductive as copper.

new form of lithography can produce extremely sharp bowtie nanoantennas for improved plasmonics

A novel mathematical procedure can reduce the computational cost of modelling quantum materials via the quantum Monte Carlo method.

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