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Electronic CHANGE TOPIC

Electronic properties news, August 2015

Scientists have invented a glue that hardens when a voltage is applied to it, allowing it to be used in wet and damp conditions.

The UK EPSRC has awarded a £6.65 million grant for research into new advanced energy materials.

Scientists have developed a novel material that possesses both spontaneous magnetization and electric polarization.

A new fabrication method allows unstable 2D materials to be isolated as single atomic layers for the first time.

Researchers observed that hydrogen sulfide becomes superconductive at minus 70 degree Celsius.

A team of judges have completed the evaluation of nominees for the 2014 Acta Student Awards.

Tuning band gap in black phosphorus for better semiconductors.

Electronic devices that use DNA to harvest energy from motion.

Transition metal sandwiches with a carbide filling.

Scientists have used a unique nano-optical probe to study the effects of illumination on two-dimensional semiconductors at the molecular level.

Flexible hybrid electronics emerging from military research.

Scientists have discovered a way to grow graphene nanoribbons directly on a conventional germanium semiconductor wafer.

Using high-pressure conditions, scientists have induced colossal magnetoresistance in a pure sample of lanthanum manganite.

The study and development of atomically thin coatings will be the focus of a new, one-of-a-kind university/industry center.

A lawn-like coating of tiny grass-like platinum wires could improve electronic devices used to communicate with the brain.

An iron-telluride material can develop superconductivity with no long-range electronic or magnetic order when ‘doped’ with sulfur.

Nanoparticles with a solid shell and a ‘yolk’ inside that can change size make a good anode for rechargeable batteries.

Developing a tunable terahertz generation using hybrid semiconductors

Scientists have demonstrated for the first time how to generate magnetism in metals that aren’t naturally magnetic.

Scientists have developed an entirely new material spun out of boron, nitrogen, carbon and oxygen.

A research team has found that catalysis and wetting, which had been considered unrelated, are in fact closely linked.

Researchers have developed a new capacitor dielectric material that provides an electrical energy storage capacity rivaling certain batteries.

Flexible electronic devices that can be injected into cavities or living tissue through a needle and interpenetrate the space have been developed.

Researchers have confirmed that Li ions prefer to aggregate at and move along defects like twin boundaries in battery electrode materials.

Research team has made electrically conducting fibers that can be reversibly stretched to over 14 times their initial length.

Engineers and physicists have discovered a property of silicon that combines aspects of all of these desirable qualities.

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