Nanomaterials news, April 2018

Defects prove beneficial for 2D materials

Defects in two-dimensional materials can enhance their physical, electrochemical, magnetic, energy and catalytic properties.

Lithium-ion batteries charge to the next level

Lithium-ion battery technology is starting to reach its physical limits.

Engineers have developed a continuous manufacturing process that can produce long strips of high-quality graphene for use in membranes.

By combining buckyballs with a molecular charge-transfer compound, scientists have produced a 2D nanosheet that expands on exposure to light.

A novel technique for inducing a composite material to become stiffer and stronger when exposed to UV light could find use in future military rotorcraft.

A novel X-ray nanoprobe beamline can observe materials down to a scale of just 10nm and capture multiple images of different material properties.

Thin, engineered material that controls the redirection and reflection of sound waves with near perfect efficiency.

Find out about the recipients of the 2018 Outstanding review awards from the Acta Journals.

Gold nanoparticles are remarkably robust when exposed to very high temperatures, but their atomic structures tend to fluctuate.

Scientists have developed the first technique able to meld ions from up to eight different elements to form high entropy alloyed nanoparticles.

Using a nanoparticle 'supersoap', scientists have developed a way to print three-dimensional structures composed entirely of liquids.

When placed between the two electrodes of a lithium-metal battery, a graphene oxide 'nanosheet' can prevent the formation of lithium dendrites.

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