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Nanomaterials news, November 2019

Scientists have discovered two co-existing phases in a layered, copper-containing crystal that are connected through a quadruple energy well.

Scientists have found that multilayer graphene is stiff when bent a little, but becomes much softer when bent a lot, as the layers slide past each other.

Embedding electrical circuits inside 3D-printed plastics to improve electronic devices

Researchers have developed a way to make cheaper, more sensitive photodetectors by replacing gold with the 2D material MXene.

Surface-plasmon-polariton waves between a metal and a dielectric may offer a way for tiny electronic components to communicate with each other.

By studying superconductivity in molybdenum disulfide, scientists have developed a superconducting transistor and discovered new superconducting states.

Using optical tweezers as a light-based ‘tractor beam’, researchers have developed a method for assembling nanomaterials into larger structures.

Using computer modeling and a novel imaging technique, scientists have been able to study the self-assembly of crystalline materials at a high resolution.

Scientists have found that a broad diffraction pattern can help determine whether graphene and other 2D materials are structurally perfect.

Applying kirigami, the Japanese art of cutting and folding, to graphene can make it more strain tolerant and adaptable to movement.

kirigami-inspired design allows graphene-based sensor devices to withstand large strains

New materials could arise from the unexpected discovery of unusual configurations of oxygen and nitrogen on graphene.

new type of membrane can filter micropollutants like pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and plasticizers from drinking or wastewater

Scientists have shown that a device made from a double layer of graphene on top of a layer of tungsten disulfide can switch spin currents on and off.

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