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Surface science news, July 2016

Scientists have used thin films to integrate functional oxide-based materials with silicon-based computer chips.

Recipients of the 2015 Acta student awards

Novel lipid-like peptoids can spontaneously form a membrane with similar properties to cell membranes found in nature.

Tungsten-based nanoparticles promise more efficient and greener lubricants.

Scientists have unveiled a new method for uniting light-capturing photonic nanomaterials and high-efficiency metal catalysts.

Scientists have developed a film that curls up and straightens out when exposed to tiny changes in ambient humidity.

A practical cloaking device made from a nanocomposite material allows curved surfaces to appear flat to electromagnetic waves.

Scientists have combined graphene with molybdenum disulfide to create an atomically-thin transistor.

Using rod-shaped bacteria to introduce nanoscale wrinkles into graphene causes it to conduct electrons differently in perpendicular directions.

Scientists have discovered that the wettability and adhesion of graphene can be controlled by doping it with metals and polymers.

Treating lithium-rich cathode materials with carbon dioxide to create surface oxygen vacancies can improve their energy storage capacity.

5500-year-old pigment known as Egyptian blue could help modern-day forensics detect fingerprints more accurately

New Editor-in-Chief for Materials Today's sister title

A new silicon-based nanomaterial can be used to stimulate individual nerve cells and manipulate the behavior of muscles and organs.

Scientists have found a way to switch the surface of a single layer of boron nitride between states with high and low wetting and adhesion.

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