Our website uses cookies

Cookies enable us to provide the best experience possible and help us understand how visitors use our website. By browsing Materials Today, you agree to our use of cookies.

Okay, I understand Learn more

Surface science news, January 2018

Plant-inspired ‘nanowrinkles’ too slippery for marine bacteria

Inspired by the pitcher plant, scientists have shown that a surface coating of 'nanowrinkles' on polymers can prevent biofouling by marine bacteria.

Researchers have found a way to produce a two-dimensional electron gas between insulating oxides on the semiconductor gallium arsenide.

An innovative platinum and copper alloy catalyst can convert methane from shale gas into hydrocarbon fuels without becoming coated in carbon.

The topological insulator trisodium bismuthide can be as electronically smooth as the highest-quality graphene-based devices.

By conducting systematic studies, researchers have provided a quantitative picture of how surface conditions control the growth of metal nanocrystals.

A method for encapsulating metals such as dysprosium and copper in a single layer of graphene could produce materials with novel properties.

Read our latest series and find out about materials science researchers in New Zealand and Australia.

Scientists have engineered ‘artificial graphene’ by replicating, for the first time, the electronic structure of graphene with semiconducting materials.

A nanotextured surface on a stainless steel alloy, produced by an electrochemical etching process, can kill bacteria while not harming mammalian cells.

Two-step thermal reduction process boosts conductivity and mobility of reduced graphene oxide (RGO), opening up new potential applications.

Scientists have produced a ‘topological excitonic insulator’ for the first time by cooling stacked semiconductors to below 10K.

News archive…

Connect with us
What’s coming up in surface science…
14
Jun ’20