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Surface science news, February 2020

Scientists have discovered that applying vibrational motion to topological materials can help sustain a persistent spin-locked current on their surfaces.

Researchers have found why some topological materials are 'fragile', unable to conduct current on their surface, and how to restore their conductivity.

Using a low-powered laser, researchers have been able to fabricate graphene features as small as 12µm onto the surface of a polymer.

Novel bubble-attracting sheets of specially textured mesh can make bubbles collapse as fast as they form, reducing the build-up of foam.

Using two forms of tomography and an algorithm for unrolling papyrus scrolls, researchers have investigated the surfaces of cylindrical electrodes.

Scientists used a silver sawtooth nanoslit array to produce valley-coherent photoluminescence in 2D tungsten disulfide at room temperature.

Using a peel-away layer of graphene, researchers can produce freestanding ultrathin layers of complex oxides and then stack them together.

Researchers have discovered that spin fluctuations may bind electrons into the pairs required for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

Researchers have discovered an exotic new form of topological state in a large class of 3D semi-metallic crystals called Dirac semimetals.

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