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Surface science news, March 2016

Fibers with gills help cells grow

Polymer fibers with ‘gills’ that resemble the underside of a mushroom could improve tissue engineering approaches to bone repair.

Cambridge researchers have shown that particle size isn’t the only concern when it comes to the risks posed by volcanic ashes.

Repeatedly crumpling and wrinkling a sheet of graphene can make it water-repellent and enhance its electrochemical properties.

European Commission EUR 3 million challenge for materials solutions to reduce concentration of particulates in urban areas

By coating transparent elastomers with silver nanowires, scientists have developed a novel technique for quickly changing the opacity of a window.

A new electron microscopy technique can follow atomic-scale physical processes occurring at the surfaces of materials in situ and in real time.

A novel ice-repellent coating made from a blend of common synthetic rubbers can cause ice to slide off surfaces.

Details of the five finalists for Elsevier's Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge.

The vibrations of the outermost atomic layers at the surface of a nanomaterial are comparatively large and play an important role in how it behaves.

Scientists have used a helium ion microscope to control the conductivity and distribution of ferroelectric domains on a 2D material.

New excitonic devices made from the 2D materials molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride can control excitons at room temperature.

A new flexible, stretchable and tunable ‘meta-skin’ uses rows of small, liquid-metal devices to cloak an object from radar.

A new metamaterial made from specially-patterned polymeric materials can separate and concentrate chemical compounds.

New flexible conductive tracks made from a liquid metal alloy can be stretched up to four times their original length in all directions.

A new surface for controlling infrared plasmons could form the basis for faster, more efficient ways of transmitting massive amounts of data.

By depositing tiny titanium oxide crystals on a rubber-like material, scientists have developed a novel device for manipulating light.

See your image on the cover of Nano Today in 2016.

Using a technique known as nanotexturing, graphene can be manipulated to create the most light-absorbent material for its weight developed to date.

A novel anti-fouling coating comprises a hydrophilic polymer that forms strong covalent bonds with various materials.

For the first time, scientists have observed electrons in graphene behaving like a fluid.

Researchers have developed a new polymer suited for photostructuring, a technique for creating micro-scale shapes.

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