Surface science news, March 2019

Researchers have found that thin layers of niobium arsenide, a Weyl semimetal, have three times the conductivity of copper at room temperature.

Researchers have found that phase-switching liquids can delay ice and frost formation up to 300 times longer than state-of-the-art anti-ice coatings.

‘living glue’ inspired by marine organisms like barnacles and mussels works underwater or in highly damp or humid conditions

fast-screening of potential non-noble metal two-dimensional catalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction

Scientists have discovered the islands that form a new layer in a crystalline material tend to form in a pattern similar to the preceding layer.

Sandwiching a layer of graphene between two layers of 2D boron nitride can produce superlattices that confer novel electrical properties.

Scientists have used a new technique called ultrafast surface X-ray scattering to visualize the motion of atoms in a 2D material.

Simulations of how surface roughness changes over time have revealed that surfaces are worn down by the action of debris particles between them.

By combining graphene with nano-ribbons of gold, researchers have developed an ultrasensitive biosensor for detecting disease-causing proteins.

The twist angle between layers of 2D semiconductors provides a ‘tuning knob’ to turn them into an exotic quantum material.

Novel simulations show that atom-sized steps on a substrate have the remarkable ability to keep monolayer crystal islands in alignment as they grow.

Researchers have shown that excitons can be trapped in the moiré pattern created by twisting a pair of 2D semiconductors.

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