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Surface science news, March 2017

A new imaging technique can visualize the evolution of micro- and nanoscale structures on a material's surface after irradiation with a laser beam.

Specially selected papers from Applied Materials Today

To celebrate the latest CiteScoreTracker value of 5.57, the Editor-in-Chief highlights three key articles.

Scientists have found a way to use a technique called magnetron-sputtering inert-gas condensation to create uniform iron nanocubes.

Water-based, biocompatible ink formulations of two-dimensional materials including graphene, MoS2, WS2, and hexagonal boron nitride.

3D printing with cellulose made easier and cheaper.

Scientists have discovered that "layer-edge-states" are responsible for the high efficiencies seen with 2D layered hybrid perovskites.

Using several analytical techniques, scientists have studied what happens when sodium ions are inserted into and extracted from an iron sulfide electrode.

Diabetes patients could soon benefit from novel blood glucose sensors made by depositing zinc oxide nanostructures on a stainless steel base.

Scientists have shown that covering surfaces with nanocones confers anti-fogging properties on them.

Researchers have found a way to remotely control the order in which a 2D sheet folds itself into a 3D structure using different wavelengths of light.

The deadline is Monday 13 March 2017.

The deadline is Monday 13 March 2017.

A new acoustic metamaterial can bend, shape and focus sound waves as they pass through it, potentially transforming medical imaging and personal audio.

Learn more about the newest addition to the Materials Today family.

A highly porous ceramic foam ink helps control structure of 3D printed materials.

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