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Surface science news, February 2019

Perspectives on the materials research landscape

Two new reports, now available for download.

New database reveals that topological materials are quite common

A new database has revealed that topological materials are quite common, and include everyday elements such as arsenic and gold.

Researchers have come up with a way for growing nanowire networks in a highly controlled and fully reproducible manner on silicon semiconductors.

Graphene's electrical properties can be engineered by covering it with another 2D material and then patterning it with an array of nanoscale holes.

A boost of vitamin C can help small gold nanorods grow into long gold nanowires for use in sensing, diagnostic and imaging applications.

Tiny differences surface roughness can cause changes in how two surfaces adhere to each other

A layer of red phosphorus on the separator in lithium metal batteries can signal when damaging dendrites threaten to create a short circuit

Infusing graphene foam with materials such as plastic, rubber and cement produces tough composites with a wide range of possible applications.

Scientists have enhanced the catalytic activity of plasmonic nanoparticles by finding a way to encapsulate them in a metal-organic framework.

3D-printed materials manufactured quickly and with improved durability and longevity

Surface roughness can cause materials to exert different amounts of force on each other depending on if they're being pushed together or pulled apart.

Tiny, electrically charged crinkles in graphene sheets can interact with molecules on the surface, causing the molecules to line up along the crinkles.

A new electron microscopy technique has revealed how atomic species attached to layers of the 2D material MXene can affect its properties.

Researchers have developed a new oil-based coating for metal that self-heals within seconds when scratched, scraped or cracked.

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