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Surface science news, September 2015

Scientists have used imperfections running through liquid crystals as a template for the synthesis of novel materials.

A non-toxic, inexpensive cathode material for sodium-ion batteries is more stable than previous versions.

Understanding the behavior of silicon nitride could lead to better performance devices for orthopedics.

A new ultra-thin invisibility ‘skin’ cloak can conform to the shape of an object and conceal it from detection with visible light.

A new study of the catalytic behavior of platinum nanoparticles has revealed the importance of the iron oxide they sit on.

For the first time, researchers have imaged how light moves inside an exotic class of matter known as hyperbolic materials.

Scientists have developed a unique model for the fast and accurate prediction of novel metal alloy materials for catalysis.

A new catalyst could help fuel-efficient automobile engines to run more cleanly and efficiently.

Simple, new technique creates tiny hollow cages of Pt with walls just a few atoms thick that could be used in catalysis.

Individual nanoparticles in solution can be resolved in 3D by combining developments in electron microscopy, biology, and computation.

Growing graphene on a liquid layers enables the production of high quality, large single crystals.

A novel catalyst made from cheap, abundant materials is almost as effective as platinum at splitting water to produce hydrogen.

Combining super-resolution microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy produces a new technique for studying pores.

Growing magnetic layers on a 2D crystal can provide highly local control over the preferred direction of the magnetism.

A new 'electron camera' shows how individual atoms move to form wrinkles in a single layer of molecules.

A novel material is able to split water by using gold nanoparticles to produce hot electrons.

A new way to study nanoparticles one at a time has revealed that seemingly identical particles can have very different properties.

Theoretical calculations suggest that the properties of atom-thick sheets of boron depend on where those atoms are deposited.

An innovative method for getting nanoparticles to self-assemble utilizes the medium in which the particles are suspended.

Engineers have created a biocompatible scaffold that allows sheets of beating heart cells to snap together just like velcro.

A novel molecular system can both absorb carbon dioxide and selectively reduce it to carbon monoxide.

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