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Materials news, January 2014

A new theoretical model developed by professors may hold the key to methods for developing better materials for solar cells.

Researchers at New York University have developed a method for creating and directing fast moving waves in magnetic fields.

Researchers have taken inspiration from the mechanics of natural structures like seashells in order to significantly increase the toughness of glass.

A Kansas State University engineer has made a breakthrough in rechargeable battery applications.

Professor of Chemistry Jason Benedict, PhD, and his team at the University at Buffalo reported on the creation of the new material called UBMOF-1.

Physicists from (FUW) show their method in new ways to form quantum dots that contain single magnetic ions.

A new type of electrical generator uses bacterial spores to harness the untapped power of evaporating water, according to research.

Scientists have been able to switch on and off robust ferromagnetism close to room temperature by using low electric fields.

Researchers have taken the first steps in a project to develop fast-blinking LED systems for underwater optical communications.

A new method could eventually find applications from nondestructive testing of materials to sound suppression.

Researchers have developed a “process friendly” technique that would enable the cooling of microprocessor chips through carbon nanotubes.

Researchers have developed a new technique that accounts for that movement and eliminates the distortion from the finished product.

Researchers at MIT have come up with a new approach to transparent displays that can have significant advantages over existing systems.

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have demonstrated broadband terahertz (THz) wave generation using metamaterials.

Synthetic biology special issue published in the journal Chemical Engineering Science

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Researchers have pioneered a new technique for forming a two-dimensional, single-atom sheet of two different materials with a seamless boundary.

Access a special issue of Polymer, focusing on porous polymers.

Researchers compared the collective responses of the motor proteins to variations in motor numbers and cargo sizes.

Duke University researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of wireless power transfer using low-frequency magnetic fields.

Two university research teams have worked together to produce the world’s fastest thin-film organic transistors.

A "hybrid" anode developed at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory could quadruple the life of lithium-sulfur batteries.

The MATLAB figure viewer is now available in over 100 Elsevier journals, spanning materials science, computer science, engineering and more.

The team has now demonstrated how a numerical simulation allows them to extract 3D data by combining diffraction patterns.

A new study on the nature of the interactions between halogen atoms in such various materials points to the possibility of designing bendy crystals.

The birthplace of the digital computer, ENIAC, is using this technology in the rebirth of analog computing.

A new method for analysing biological samples based on their chemical makeup is set to transform the way medical scientists examine diseased tissue.

Researchers at ETH are developing electronic components that are thinner and more flexible than before.

Researchers in the United States have suggested an alternative way to allocate science funding.

Engineers hope a new type of vaccine shown to work in mice will one day make it cheaper and easy to manufacture on-demand vaccines for humans.

A team has developed a new X-ray holography method that will enable snap-shots of dynamic processes at highest spatial resolution.

Researchers have found an easy way to modify the molecular structure of a polymer commonly used in solar cells.

Researchers have developed a technique for creating nanoparticles that carry two different cancer-killing drugs into the body.

A team of scientists from NUS has successfully developed a method to chemically exfoliate molybdenum disulfide crystals.

Researchers are abandoning hunches and intuition to discover cheaper materials that mimic their purer, more expensive counterparts.

New research reveals a new method that allows both the growth and transfer steps of graphene on a silicon wafer.

We look over the best materials science news items that are the most read over the month of December 2013.

Despite extensive research, materials providing lossless conduction of electricity at room temperature are missing up to now.

Researchers have developed a way to microscopically view battery electrodes while they are bathed in wet electrolytes.

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