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Materials news, September 2016

Two new multi-functional infrared materials shown.

Scientists have discovered why perovskites make such effective solar cell materials, which could lead to the development of even better materials.

Read more about Materials Today @ New Scientist Live 2016.

Researchers have managed to create a new room-temperature multiferroic by combining two non-multiferroic materials.

Roll-process technology that transfer and packages large-scale integrated circuits

Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon thin film acts as a high capacity, binder-free supercapacitor

Using artificial intelligence, chemists have computed the characteristics of about two million crystals made up of four chemical elements.

A combination of theory and experiment has gone some way to revealing the ingredients required for high-temperature superconductivity.

Scientists have developed a thin metamaterial structure that can completely absorb very low frequency sound for nearly every angle of incidence.

A material made from graphene nanoribbons and polyethylene glycol could help to heal damaged spinal cords in people.

Spinal cord repair with graphene-polymer nanoribbons.

Carbon nanomaterials have exceptional water transport and sieving properties that could allow them to take over from polymeric membranes.

Researchers have developed a new way to shape and surface treat plastic components at the same time.

Weaving solar-powered fabrics that generate electricity from sun and movement.

Scientists have developed an improved method for turning asphalt into a porous material that can capture greenhouse gases from natural gas.

The recent development of a method for measuring structural defects in polymers led to a theory for predicting their elasticity.

Using cellulose and polymers, scientists have developed a new strategy for crafting nanorods from a wide range of precursor materials.

Scientists have synthesized nanometer-sized cage molecules that can be used to transport charge in proton exchange membranes.

Researchers have created the world’s largest database of elemental crystal surfaces and shapes to date, dubbed Crystalium.

Scientists have developed a method for allowing materials to self-heal cracks at temperatures well below freezing.

Scientists have discovered an inorganic semiconductor with a double helix structure that makes it highly flexible.

Browse the articles in this special issue with free access until the end of 2016.

For the first time, scientists have used a scanning transmission electron microscope to directly write tiny patterns in metallic ‘ink’.

Scientists have developed a versatile method for patterning the structure of ‘nanowires’ made from amyloid peptides.

Scientists have developed a novel etching process that can allow metals such as aluminum, titanium or zinc to bond with nearly any other material.

A novel polyphenyline membrane for fuel cells operates over a wide temperature range and lasts three times longer than existing membranes.

Porous carbon for carbon capture

Nanodiamonds and other carbon-based materials can be produced by smashing carbon nanotubes against a target at high speeds.

Cutting fuel cell costs with noble aerogels.

Scientists have developed a responsive, hybrid material, powered by its own chemical reactions, that can recognize simple patterns.

The thermal conductivity of buckyball-containing superatom crystals is directly related to the rotational disorder within those structures.

Flakes of graphene welded together by spark plasma sintering produce materials that may be suitable for use as bone implants.

A pulsed-laser process can improve the electrical conductivity of inkjet-printed graphene without damaging the surfaces on which it is printed.

Flexible smart windows from niobium oxides (Image: Cockrell School of Engineering

Scientists have discovered that a critical length scale marks the transition between a zero-dimensional quantum dot and a one-dimensional nanowire.

Using electron microscopy, scientists have uncovered the first atomic scale evidence for strain-induced ferroelectricity in a layered oxide.

Samarium nickelate can be electrically tuned between a transparent and an opaque state over an unprecedentedly broad spectrum range.

The hairy leaves of aquatic ferns can help to clean oil spills.

Silicon nanoparticles based devices that can be controlled for light manipulation.

Scientists have discovered that electron anions can reduce the temperature at which mayenite changes from a crystal to a glass.

By sandwiching gallium and nitrogen atoms between layers of graphene and silicon carbide, scientists have produced 2D gallium nitride.

spider silk superlens improves on traditional microscopy

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