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Materials news, December 2014

promising new catalyst candidate for hydrogen fuel

A University of Oregon spectroscopy experiment has opened a window on how captured sunlight can be converted into electricity.

Researchers have found a way of binding peptides to the surface of gallium nitride (GaN).

A team at Cornell University has made a breakthrough in that direction with a room-temperature magnetoelectric memory device.

Happy New Year from the team here at Materials Today!

An engineering team has discovered some of graphene oxide's important properties that can improve sodium- and lithium-ion flexible batteries.

A novel conductive, easy-to-process polymer synthesized could be promising for bio-applications such as bionic devices.

Densified porous titanium scaffolds loaded could improve mechanical properties and bioactivity of implants in orthopedics and dentistry.

The discovery of a new form of ice could lead to an improved understanding of our planet’s geology.

Researchers havr devised the first detailed model to quantify what they believe was the last unknown characteristic of film formation.

Researchers have created flexible, patterned sheets of multilayer graphene from a cheap polymer by burning it with a computer-controlled laser.

Engineers have demonstrated a way to trap light, using a phenomenon called bound states in the continuum (BIC).

Future fitness trackers could soon add blood-oxygen levels to the list of vital signs measured with new technology developed.

Tuning permittivity using pairs of meta materials.

What happened in Materials Science in November 2014?

A coating technique developed to protect turbine engine and waste incinerator components against heat and oxidation.

Multilayer windows that are self-cleaning, energy-saving and anti-fogging may be one step closer, thanks to a team of Chinese researchers.

A new discovery about uranium dioxide will help scientists select the best computational model to simulate severe nuclear reactor accidents.

Inexpensive hydrolyzable polymer could help in biomedicine and degradable materials.

Rewritable paper that works with photomasks and ultraviolet.

Super thin lenses could find use in both consumer electronics and bioimaging.

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