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Materials news, November 2015

A new material combines the flexibility of polymer gels with the rigid structure of metal-based clusters.

A new symmetry operation has the potential to speed up the search for new advanced materials.

A novel 'flexo-electric' nanomaterial is able to change shape when an electrical voltage is applied or generate electricity when its shape is changed.

A new catalyst made of graphene with metal nanoparticles can promote the organic reactions used in the manufacture of drugs and pesticides.

Using pulses of laser light, physicists have been able to trap light at the surface of graphene and move it around.

Adding quantum dots made out of iron pyrite to lithium-ion batteries makes them charge quickly over dozens of cycles.

The first ever porous liquid is able to dissolve unusually large amounts of gas.

on-chip metamaterial helps photonic devices

using sound waves to investigate new semiconductor

Understanding the properties of methane hydrates.

SLM Solutions Group AG reports that it achieved significant sales revenue growth during the first nine months of 2015.

Using a clay-based electrolyte, scientists have developed a lithium-ion battery that can work at high temperatures.

Novel sandwich like sensor made up of graphene and polymer layers could identify damage and structural changes in materials or the human body.

Halloysite clay nanotubes for drug delivery.

A new technique called ‘gas adsorption crystallography’ provides a new way to study the process by which MOFs store immense volumes of gases.

A novel synthetic, sticky hydrogel can adhere to a wide range of surfaces with a toughness comparable to the bond between cartilage on bone.

A novel gel can extract precious metals such as silver and gold from waste to form a hybrid nanomaterial.

a novel piezoelectric energy harvester based on composite structure could enable more efficient performance

Scientists have developed a technique to make titanium stronger without sacrificing any of the metal's ductility.

Magnets guide ceramic fibers for 3D printing of strong composites

Graphene nanofoam electrodes show higher capacity and faster transport in lithium-ion batteries when treated with hydrogen.

Serum albumin as a source of natural hydrogel precursor

Boron-doped graphene improves on graphene's gas sensitivity for ammonia and NOx

Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays for efficience electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide

A consortium of British and Chinese scientists has produced novel quantum dots that could be used in imaging, drug delivery and cancer therapy.

Korean engineers have shown that a specially-designed aluminium surface could help improve the air quality produced by air-conditioning units.

Scientists have uncovered 'sweet points' in time as dental cement sets, when it starts to approach the toughness of teeth.

'Crumpling’ to increase the surface area of graphene-gold nanostructures enhances surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

Scientists have discovered a surprising three-dimensional arrangement of electrons in a high-temperature superconductor.

Boron graphene sensors are able to detect noxious gas molecules such as ammonia and nitrogen oxides at extremely low concentrations.

Scientists have discovered that applying an electric field to glass causes it to soften at lower temperatures.

Using hydrogen to enhance lithium ion batteries

Scientists have developed a flexible metal-organic framework for storing natural gas in car fuel tanks.

Scientists have used microscopy and spectroscopy techniques to solve the structure of lithium- and manganese-rich transition metal oxides.

A novel lithium-oxygen battery has very high energy density, is more than 90% efficient, and can be recharged more than 2000 times.

Alloys made from equal amounts of up to four different metallic elements are very effective at withstanding radiation damage.

Graphene doped with nitrogen and augmented with cobalt atoms makes an effective catalyst for splitting water.

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