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Materials news, January 2018

Plant-inspired ‘nanowrinkles’ too slippery for marine bacteria

Inspired by the pitcher plant, scientists have shown that a surface coating of 'nanowrinkles' on polymers can prevent biofouling by marine bacteria.

Layered material proves to have handy electronic structure

Scientists have used spiraling X-rays to observe, for the first time, chirality, or handedness, in swirling electric patterns in a layered material.

Nanotechnology limits on carbon nanotubes.

The development of a new lithium-ion conducting ceramic textile could get us a step closer to practical solid-state lithium metal batteries.

A new tin-based perovskite solar cell allows 'hot' electrons to retain their high energy levels for longer than usual, which could help produce more power.

Scientists have witnessed the concentration of lithium inside individual nanoparticles in a battery electrode reverse during power generation.

Operating according to simple mathematical logic statements, a novel hydrogel will only release its drug cargo in response to specific physiological cues.

Twisting films of carbon nanotubes produces short lengths of strong, conductive fibers in about an hour, making this process much faster than spinning.

The MPIF has reported the death of Stanley (Stan) Abkowitz recently at the age of 90.

Super black birds could inspire meta materials.

Cleaning nanotubes through heat and ion bombardment.

3D printing soft tissue scaffolds.

Using carbon nanotubes and modified graphene nano ribbons in fuel cells.

For the first time, researchers have compared measurements of a class of metals produced by neutron scattering with realistic theoretical calculations.

A nanostructure made from a fluoropolymer and metal oxide materials allows thin-film transistors to operate with unprecedented stability.

Photocatalyst based on titanium dioxide can turn carbon dioxide into usable fuel and reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Hair-thin OLED fibers could have fashion and healthcare applications.

New technique offers strong and resilient ultrafine polymer fibers with a range of applications.

Scientists have developed a water-absorbing metal-organic framework that can suck up to twice its weight in atmospheric moisture.

Researchers have discovered a way to flip an iron-based superconductor between superconducting and non-superconducting states using a microscope.

Researchers have found a way to produce a two-dimensional electron gas between insulating oxides on the semiconductor gallium arsenide.

A crystal with an exterior case surrounding a rotating axis is the first proof that a single material can be both static and moving, or amphidynamic.

An innovative platinum and copper alloy catalyst can convert methane from shale gas into hydrocarbon fuels without becoming coated in carbon.

Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes or modified graphene nanoribbons could replace the platinum cathodes that currently reduce oxygen in fuel cells.

A novel process called gel electrospinning can produce ultrafine polymer fibers that are exceptionally strong and tough.

The topological insulator trisodium bismuthide can be as electronically smooth as the highest-quality graphene-based devices.

By conducting systematic studies, researchers have provided a quantitative picture of how surface conditions control the growth of metal nanocrystals.

Researchers have developed the first single metalens able to focus the entire visible spectrum of light in the same spot and in high resolution.

A novel method for removing contaminants from carbon nanotubes has helped to reveal why their electrical properties are so difficult to measure.

By utilizing flat coils with different shapes, scientists have adapted nuclear magnetic resonance to study nanomaterials and exotic states of matter.

Asymmetrical polymer particles imprinted with DNA are able to bind together in a spatially defined manner for use in biomedicine and 'soft robotics'.

Applying pressure at the nanoscale to two layers of graphene transforms them into a super-hard, diamond-like material, termed diamene.

A method for encapsulating metals such as dysprosium and copper in a single layer of graphene could produce materials with novel properties.

The transfer of energy from nanomaterials to molecules can go both ways, causing the nanomaterials to photoluminesce over long timescales.

Quantum effects allow samarium nickelate to mimic a shark's sixth sense, by detecting minute electric fields in salt water.

Lithium-ion batteries designed to be safer in an accident.

Read our latest series and find out about materials science researchers in New Zealand and Australia.

Jellyfish-inspired triboelectric nanogenerator can harvest energy from waves and power sensors that can detect fluctuations in the water surface.

Comparing the results reported in thousands of papers about the properties of MOFs revealed that replicability could be a problem in material science.

Scientists have engineered ‘artificial graphene’ by replicating, for the first time, the electronic structure of graphene with semiconducting materials.

Adding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon produces a material that can adsorb more than two times its weight of carbon dioxide.

Electric eel inspires energy system for wearables.

Quick, split and make hydrogen from water.

Flexible stretchable bacterial bio-batteries.

Researchers have found a simple way to deposit magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles onto silica-coated gold nanorods for biomedical applications.

3D tattoos light up for chemical sensing.

A new hyperlens crystal made from hexagonal boron nitride with isotopically pure boron can resolve features as small as 30nm in size.

Improved DNA detection using nanopore sensors.

Two-step thermal reduction process boosts conductivity and mobility of reduced graphene oxide (RGO), opening up new potential applications.

Fabrication of the first-ever metallic glass nanotube arrays on a Si substrate by a simple lithography and sputter deposition process.

Solar power device like a double-glazed window offers new approach.

First technique capable of determining lithium metal plating during lithium ion battery charging reported in Materials Today.

A new method based on vaporizing a frozen solution with a laser can create hybrid thin-film materials that would otherwise be impossible to make.

Batteries powered by sweat made completely from fabric

Novel bioactive nanocomposite hydrogel based on hyaluronic acid and self-assembled bisphosphonate-magnesium nanoparticles facilitates bone regeneration.

A new technique for 3D printing metals, which utilizes ultrafast cooling, can produce components with exceptional levels of strength and ductility.

Adding a tiny amount of boron to a carbon-containing plasma can alter the grain size and electrical properties of the diamond film produced by the plasma.

Using analytical techniques, scientists have discovered how the atomic structure of lithium-rich battery cathodes evolves during charging and discharging.

Scientists have developed a new method for produce semiconducting graphene nanoribbons by heating a specially-prepared polymer.

Scientists have determined the mechanisms that cause tiny wires of molybdenum disulfide to extend into tungsten diselenide at their interface.

Scientists have developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics.

Scientists have produced a ‘topological excitonic insulator’ for the first time by cooling stacked semiconductors to below 10K.

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