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Materials news, August 2016

Tiny balloons made from graphene can withstand pressures higher than those at the bottom of the deepest ocean.

By combining a covalent organic framework with a conducting polymer, scientists have produced an efficient electrode material for batteries.

Scientists have developed a solid-state lithium ion battery with a porous lithium garnet electrolyte and a viscous electrode that seeps into the pores.

Windows made of transparent wood could offer more even and consistent natural lighting and better energy efficiency than glass.

Harvard University has licensed a new materials discovery platform to a company developing novel OLED display technologies.

Novel strategy to control dental plaque relies on a catalytic iron oxide nanoparticles and hydrogen peroxide.

Using atomic force microscopy, scientists have discovered that graphene nanoribbons naturally form folds and loops in solution.

Using a roll-to-roll processing method, researchers have produced polymer-based solar cells with a conversion efficiency of more than 9.5%.

Scientists have managed to elucidate the structure of two metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with neon gas captured inside them.

Find out about the winners of the VUVX Student Prize.

Find out who won a prize for their poster at EMRS Spring meeting 2016.

Scientists have developed a new, simple method for fabricating transparent electronic circuitry using inexpensive and readily available materials.

New superlenses made from titanium dioxide nanoparticles can reveal surface features not previously visible through a light microscope.

Dr. Alexander van Driessche is the winner of the 2016 Schieber Award.

Jing-yang Wang is the recipient of the 2017 Acta Materialia Silver Medal.

John J. Jonas receives the 2017 Acta Materialia Gold Medal.

Treating hybrid halide perovskite solar cells with a solution of methyl ammonium bromide can repair defects in the perovskite film.

A new imaging technique can produce 3D chemical maps that track chemical reactions in a battery as it charges and discharges.

Scientists have used metal-organic frameworks to develop a new kind of electrochromic material that can quickly change from clear to opaque.

Glasses based on calcium and phosphate have been synthesized using soft chemistry at low temperatures with water as a solvent.

Researchers have 3D laser lithography to produce atomic force microscopy probes of any shape and with a radius down to just 25nm.

Microscopic voids and particles of calcium hydroxide play an important role in in giving concrete its strength and toughness.

Scientists have found a way to direct the self-assembly of multiple molecular patterns within a single material, producing new nanoscale architectures.

Using the centuries-old concept of bistable beams, researchers have developed a way to send mechanical signals through soft materials.

Scientists have developed a working lithium-ion battery that dissolves away in 30 minutes when dropped in water.

Scientists have discovered that ferroelectric materials can produce solar cells able to generate power from 'hot electrons'.

Scientists have developed a novel superconducting material by heating a mixture of platinum, lanthanum and arsenic under pressure.

zwitterionic polymers – that contains an equal number of positively and negatively charged groups – can protect therapeutic proteins from immune response

Submit your abstract for the Fifth International Conference on Multifunctional, Hybrid and Nanomaterials from the 6 to 10 March 2017.

Scientists have discovered the optimum amount of selenium to add to cadmium-telluride solar cells to enhance their efficiency.

Using advanced microscopy techniques, scientists have visualized the charge/discharge reaction in lithium-ion batteries in real-time.

conductive and transparent metal-coated nanofiber mats that are both could make flexible electronic devices easier to produce

Temperature could hold the key to growing carbon nanotubes of a particular chirality or 'handedness'

Bonding composite layers with carbon nanotubes produces a material that is substantially stronger than other advanced composites.

A new silicon-tin nanocomposite anode can enhance the charge capacity and extend the lifetime of lithium-ion batteries.

Researchers have developed a novel metal-free metamaterial whose optical properties can be changed at the flick of a switch.

Electrons travelling though graphene do not behave like particles but like a wave

A new three-dimensional lattice structure can absorb a wide range of vibrations and also act as a load-bearing component.

Dr. Warren Poole wins the 2017 Acta Materialia Holloman Award for Materials & Society.

A new way to predict which binary alloys will form metallic glasses could lead to the development of strong, conductive materials.

Scientists have engineered biodegradable silicon nanoparticles that when illuminated can make nerve cells fire and heart cells beat.

Dr. Thomas J. Webster receives the first Acta Biomaterialia Silver Medal Award.

Using a substrate made from boron nitride, scientists have produced monolayer graphene nanoribbons with zigzag edges.

Gold nanowires heat up a bit when illuminated by a laser at room temperature, but heat up far more when illuminated at ultracold conditions.

Register to attend a session with Prof. Kam Leong, Editor-in-chief of Biomaterials.

Treating the biopolymer polylactic acid at various temperatures and pressures can induce a new, more robust polymer phase in the material.

Scientists have developed a novel way to produce 2D nanosheets by separating bulk materials with nontoxic liquid nitrogen.

Scientists have discovered that nitrogen-doped graphene can greatly enhance the sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy.

By firing a plastic projectile into silicon at 12,000mph, scientists have been able to watch pressure-induced changes in crystal structure in real time.

Scientists have developed a novel garnet-type, fast ionic conducting oxide as a solid electrolyte in an all-solid-state rechargeable battery.

The discovery that spider silk has a phonon band gap could lead to the development of novel acoustic and insulating materials.

Researchers have produced a new class of materials called sodium polyhydrides, which could possess superconducting properties.

Engineers have discovered that interfacing two insulating oxide-based materials makes them highly conductive.

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