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Materials news, February 2014

Reducing film thickness by over an order of magnitude.

Saving pre­cious nanosec­onds.

Improved absorption in ultrathin semiconductors.

A team of researchers have devised a way of making tiny holes of controllable size in sheets of graphene, which could lead to water purification.

Using an inexpensive 3-D printer, biomedical engineers have developed a custom-fitted device that could transform treatment of cardiac disorders.

Engineers have found their novel fiber architecture can transmit images with a quality rivaling the current commercial endoscopy imaging fibers.

Scientists have found a creative way to radically improve thermoelectric materials, a finding that could lead to the development of improved solar panels.

Researchers combined cheap, oxide-based materials to split water into hydrogen and oxygen gases using solar energy.

A team of UConn chemists has discovered a new way of making a class of porous materials that allows for greater manufacturing.

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a new type of low-temperature fuel cell that directly converts biomass to electricity.

Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have tested a new approach to fabricating spin valves.

UCLA researchers have created a drug delivery system that may have less severe side effects than traditional glaucoma medication

Researches describe a new approach to switch on and off magnetism, which can lead to a new generation of better-performing electronic devices.

Read an introduction to the topic of glass reinforced epoxy composite liners for protecting against corrosion in oil pipelines.

ASU scientists, along with colleagues at Argonne National Laboratory, have reported advances toward perfecting a functional artificial leaf.

Scientists reveal graphene's ability to absorb electromagnetic radiation – energy from across the radio frequency spectrum.

New method allows nanoscale patterning of polymer electrolyte films using an electron beam.

Materials Today is happy to announce that proceedings for the forthcoming ANM 2014 meeting will be published in Materials Today: Proceedings.

Researchers at the University of Manchester have tested how good graphene membranes are as filters for liquid water.

Researchers at the Brookhaven National Laboratory have combined atoms with multiple orbitals and precisely pinned down their electron distributions.

Researchers have introduced a unique micro-robotic technique to assemble the components of complex materials, the foundation of tissue engineering.

A team of researchers at the University of Vienna unveiled the superconducting pairing mechanism in Calcium doped graphene using the ARPES method

For the first time, a team of chemists and engineers at Penn State have placed tiny synthetic motors inside live human cells,

Northwestern University researchers find that water molecules traveling through tiny carbon nanotube pipes flow intermittently like stop-and-go traffic.

Researchers has developed a chewing gum-like battery material that could dramatically improve the safety of lithium ion batteries.

At the Vienna University of Technology the phenomenon of self-assembly is being investigated by studying inhomogeneously charged particles.

Due to a new dynamic materials developed at the University of Illinois, removable paint and self-healing plastics could soon be household products.

A team led by NC State University is opening the door to multifunctional spintronic smart sensors for use in military applications.

Researchers at the University of Illinois have obtained atomic-level images of a molecule in its natural watery environment using sheets of graphene.

Researchers have observed a catalyst surface at work in real time and are able to resolve its atomic structure in detail.

Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf have come up with a strategy which combines DNA origami with self-organized pattern formation.

A new multidisciplinary, open access journal.

Researchers have developed a highly selective catalyst capable of electrochemically converting carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide.

Researchers are creating a polarized light source for such things as energy-saving computer screens and wiretap-proof communications.

The most popular breaking news in the world of materials science from January 2014.

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