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Materials news, January 2017

Simulations of one-dimensional boron ribbons and chains have revealed they possess several unique properties.

Scientists have worked out how to make and measure the properties of a time crystal, which has an atomic structure that repeats in time.

Biocompatible nanocarriers containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and a common antibiotic can treat biofilms.

Polymer combined with carbon nanotubes matches the flexibility and conductivity of cardiac tissue.

Details of the Acta Gold Medal award session have been announced.

Biomimetic nano cargo carriers.

A general framework for designing reconfigurable metamaterials can be applied to everything from meter-scale architectures to nano-scale systems.

A titanium surface covered in fluorinated nanotubes can repel blood and so could reduce blood clotting by medical implants.

3D biofunctional silk materials.

Simple strategy for creating solutions of two-dimensional nanomaterials could make large-scale production of future devices easier and cheaper.

Biomimicry of the beetle helps material design.

Stretched fibers of bacterial cellulose could strengthen a new generation of ‘green’ nanocomposites.

coating metal electrodes used to probe brain activity with graphene could be safer for patients and enable more accurate measurements

Terahertz scanner based on a carbon nanotube film is flexible, portable, and wearable.

hydrogen bonding enables the fabrication of stretchable, self-healing semiconducting polymer transistors paving the way for wearable electronics

Porous 3D form of graphene produced using heat and pressure

Scientists have used a new approach to investigate the formation of defects in materials at the atomic scale and in near-real time.

Structural defects and jagged surfaces of nanoparticles shown to be key to catalysis.

Researchers have developed a technique in which nanoscale perovskite particles self-assemble to produce more efficient, stable and durable LEDs.

A novel optical characterization method has revealed that in 2D crystals there is a strong interaction between crystal quality and valley polarization.

New theory of coffee-ring effect could keep solar panels clean, improve DNA sequencing.

A new computational model can calculate how metallic glasses morph over time when they are put under mechanical stress.

Scientists have produced the most tightly knotted physical structure ever known, which could lead to a new generation of advanced materials.

Depending on the synthesis conditions, gold nanoclusters can self-assemble to form 2D hexagonally-ordered layers or 3D capsid structures.

Scientists have used a unique infrared probe to study how the atomic structure of gold and platinum nanoparticles affects their function as catalysts.

Scientists have woven a 'smart' fabric that mimics the sophisticated and complex properties of the bone tissue periosteum.

In some water-splitting catalysts, oxygen comes from within the catalyst material itself, as well as from the surrounding water molecules.

Crystals that form spontaneously on exposure to carbon dioxide could offer a new option for carbon capture and storage strategies.

Placing cones that act as nano-chimneys between graphene and carbon nanotubes could enhance heat dissipation from nano-electronics.

Compressing and fusing flakes of graphene can produce a porous, lightweight 3D material with a strength 10 times that of steel.

Defects in cement that catch layers of the material as they move past each other can produce concrete that is tougher and stronger.

A new one-dimensional, core-shell-type crystalline wire made from organic-inorganic hybrid materials can emit light efficiently.

Submissions for the 8th annual Reaxys PhD Prize are now open.

Researchers have been able to create a high-pressure form of germanium, known as ST12, in a large enough sample size to confirm its characteristics.

Conductive ink made from silver nanowires can print inexpensive, customizable circuit patterns on just about any surface.

Firing highly-charged xenon ions at graphene has revealed that the electrons in this material are highly mobile, generating a very high current density.

Scientists have used tiny diamonds known as use diamondoids to assemble atoms into the thinnest possible electrical wires, just three atoms wide.

Christopher Hutchinson and Tadashi Furuhara join the Acta Journals.

A novel self-assembly technique can create multilayer, multi-patterned 3D nanoscale structures with unprecedented complexity.

Through changes in its atomic vibration energy, graphene can distinguish a single hyperactive cancerous cell from a normal cell.

Enjoy free access to the anniversary special issue of Current Opinion in Solid State & Materials Science.

Dr. Yanming Ma has joined Computational Materials Science as an Associate Editor.

Sodium-embedded carbon nanowalls make highly effective electrodes in electronic devices such as solar cells and supercapacitors.

Scientists have developed a novel solid-state battery by placing ultra-thin aluminum oxide between lithium electrodes and a solid garnet electrolyte.

By optimizing the antireflection properties, scientists have fabricated a flexible transparent conductor from an ultrathin metal film.

Novel fuel cell catalysts comprising atomically-ordered platinum-lead 'nanoplates' display high catalytic activity, stability and durability.

Graphene forms the basis for a new imaging platform that can map the electrical fields generated by networks of heart and nerve cells.

Insight into the friction in layered graphene.

Nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots can convert carbon dioxide into complex hydrocarbons like ethylene and ethanol.

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